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20121201
20121231
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KQEH (PBS) 5
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English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the real problem, the real causes, and that's what the nra is trying to do. >>> and thousands of americans raise their voices this holiday >>> and thousands of americans raise their voices this holiday season. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" on december 24, 2012. >>> good morning. we begin with a major storm that promises a white but treacherous christmas for parts of the midwest and northeast. the storm is expected to get stronger as it heads east. winter weather alerts and advisories are posted from texas to indiana. all this during one of the busiest travel days of the year. jeff at our miami station has more. >> well, this is shaping up to be a very stormy week across the united states. now, the good news is during the day today at least it should be fairly quiet. there'll be a small storm in the eastern part of the country producing a little light rain to the south and snow to north. the bigger issue is what happens on christmas day. across the southeast, we could be talking about a widespread severe weather outbreak and maybe numerous tornadoes nebras anyw
slamming the nra calling the group's leader a gun nut and politicians divided along party lines with the thought of more guns in schools. >> i do not believe that those remarks represent anywhere near a significant portion of america. >> school safety is a complex issue with no simple no single solution but i believe trained, armed security is one key component among many that can provide the first line of difference as well as the last line of defense. >> reporter: the debate over semi-automatic weapons and high capacity magazines has raged since the shooting at sandy hook. a gallup poll found 53% agreed increasing police presence in schools would be very effective. a third said somewhat effective, 12% said not effective and 42% said banning the sale of automatic weapons and nor an third, 36% said it would not be effective. feel free to weigh in on my page at rick levanthol over the debate of gun rights and greater restrictions continues. >> heather: rick, thank you. >> gregg: search for justice in the benghazi, libya terror attacks. a scathing report placing blame squarely for
at all. the nra makes it seem like -- they fearmonger toward that idea but i think we need to not be offensive to those who have been killed and will be in the future by gun violence that can be -- and the nra leadership battles against even the most simple common sensical responses to this massive problem. >> and the white house certainly going to push. the president is going to talk about guns in his state of the union address next month. and my piece lays out as he does that, he can call for certain gun safety things. there's a lot that polls well, a lot that could arguably help deal with various problems. but the white house knows based on the polling that the president's going to have to talk about it as part of a balanced approach and cliche again today. and that he's going to have to explain in it a way that it doesn't seem like he's tramibling on the 2nd amendment. >> yeah. i actually agree with that, james. i think go ahead with gun control, go ahead with the things that make sense but in a way that's respectful. kudos for number two on the list, only use the word
, both the n.r.a. and those opposed to the n.r.a. never bring up the point of the second amendment that when it was written there was no such thing as an automatic or even semi-automatic weapon. these were all blocks, for god's sake. the law has to be brought up to date. so i'd like to hear your answer to both of those problems. i'll take it off the air. thank you. guest: charles, i appreciate those questions and certainly our guns and weapons of choice have changed throughout the years and our laws have changed as well. it's my understanding the state of connecticut had the type of gun laws that have been proposed and they didn't work. at the end of the day it's an individual person, it's a people problem. and changing laws doesn't necessarily change hearts. it is a cultural problem as well. that's why i don't think we need to change these laws but we need to look at an issue of society where violence has become acceptable in many avenues and simply need to turn on the television many nights to see that. the first question was about the top 2% and class warfare and what is going o
. another of its events featured guns. >> this is the nra-sponsored shooting event. for legislators and for lobbyists. free. >> there was even one offering free cigars. >> sponsored by reynolds american, which is one of the biggest tobacco companies in the world, and the cigar association of america. >> it sounds like lobbying. it looks like lobbying. it smells like lobbying. but alec says it's not lobbying. in fact, alec operates not as a lobby group, but as a nonprofit, a charity. in its filing with the i.r.s. filing, alec says its mission is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one
is sketchy. in fact, it is was the n.r.a. and other gun rights movement have scared congress into passing rules into keeping data. we do know for sure. some estimates put it at 40% of guns by unlicensed sellers. but nobody really knows. we know the number of background checks performed. we don't know the rest. guest: we don't have a registry of gun owners and, in fact, the rules are opposite. the rules are so strict that the f.b.i. can't keep data on its gun checks more than 24 hours. they have to purge their data every day and that includes data of people who have been prohibited from buying guns. there is other perverse things in the law. if you are on the terrorist watch list and prohibited from flying you are not in the instant check system, you are not prohibited from buying a gun unless you follow in one of those categories. host: if the f.b.i. has to purge within 24 hours, could somebody buy a gun every three days, two three days or so? are there limits on how many guns you can buyin a year? guest: there is not a federal limit. you can buy a dozen guns or two dozen guns, you can bu
afraid of the nra, if they were to stand up and do what's right for the american public, we would all be a lot better off. host: mayor michael bloomberg yesterday. our question for you is whether gun laws should change? the wall street journal as the deadline-- -- headline -- now allison from trenton on our independent line. caller: 1 question to be answered is whether or not anybody can put forth a good reason for people to have these guns. give me an example of a time when it has come in handy, or it's been a great thing, where it has worked to the benefit of someone or group of people. why are they needed? if someone can give a positive answer about that, then maybe i would think that the assault weapons are needed. otherwise, i cannot see reason for it. i'm against gun ownership in terms of having assault weapons. if you have to have one to protect yourself and home, that's one thing. but rifles that are used for war to have as an everyday weapon makes no sense. host: on twitter -- and here's the new york times -- let's hear from paul in pittsburgh, pennsylvania, a republican. cal
with depression. i've always worked in social work. they could have as much influence as athe nra. host: you are nodding your head about that. guest: i beg to differ with you on that. they are part of my task force which meets every other week with about 40 other professionals from schools and psychologists. we work on the different issues. host: what is their mission? guest: to work on the mental health issue. they did not exert as much of their influence where they could or should. i think that is a stigma and that they are not as well organized in outreach and be able to get out to the different areas that are needed. i know them very well and they are wonderful people. there are wonderful organizations that need to work with them. they are effective. we need to work at the local levels at the schools, where children were working at the -- they can begin to spot some of these disorders and talk to the parents and to try to solve them at the early ages. that is one thing that one group does. they provide grants and scholarships to put on site clinicians to help these youngsters, educate th
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)